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  #11  
Old 10-07-2010, 10:25 PM
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champ champ is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by future_doc View Post
Ethical and critical thinking under time constraints requiring one to be precise and concise, mirroring reality - the perfect test for each to show what they are made of.
What do u suggest doing to prepare F_D?
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  #12  
Old 10-07-2010, 10:46 PM
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nosuperman nosuperman is offline
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Originally Posted by teresachang View Post
Hi guys, I'm confused. I thought the Casper is more like a personality and HR type of tests. Does it test us on actual knowledge of ethics and healthcare?

If anyone has beta tested or can offer any insight, please post. Thanks!
It won't test you on factual data concerning healthcare. Think of it like a online MMI or check out the old Mac essay -if 3 sentences can be called an essay- questions. Note I wasn't involved with the beta testing, this is just how its been marketed from the beginning.
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  #13  
Old 10-08-2010, 01:44 PM
teresachang teresachang is offline
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Thanks for the clarifications. Does anyone have any suggestions on how we can prepare for the CASPER? besides reading up on current health care issues?

Thanks
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  #14  
Old 10-13-2010, 04:06 PM
Theophilus Theophilus is offline
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http://casper.mcmaster.ca/demo/questionsamp.html


Sample Questions:

* Q1: You must make your decision now. What is your answer? Why?

* Q2: Should insistence for this surgery relieve the surgeon of all liability? Explain.

* Q3: Should a patient be allowed to sue if the surgeon refuses to operate in these circumstances? Defend your response.

According to the video, I'm an expert in performing these surgeries that likely leave people paralyzed :S hehe

Wanna discuss this sample? What do you guys think?

I'm guessing that they will judge your answers based on how well reasoned, compassionate, and well put together they are, and not on how much bioethics we know etc. though I guess it would help coming up with an answer
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  #15  
Old 10-13-2010, 04:51 PM
future_doc future_doc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by champ View Post
What do u suggest doing to prepare F_D?
Other than the suggestion immeidately above, I suggest the best form of preparation is no preparation. You are coming to the table with an agile and ethical mind, having the ability to think critically and solve problems in a timely manner. Just be sharp and up to the task, i.e., have a good night's sleep, a regular meal and you are fit to go.
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For MMI Prep, See:
http://www.premed101.com/forums/showthread.php?t=48582
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  #16  
Old 10-13-2010, 07:02 PM
MA246 MA246 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Theophilus View Post
http://casper.mcmaster.ca/demo/questionsamp.html


Sample Questions:

* Q1: You must make your decision now. What is your answer? Why?

* Q2: Should insistence for this surgery relieve the surgeon of all liability? Explain.

* Q3: Should a patient be allowed to sue if the surgeon refuses to operate in these circumstances? Defend your response.

According to the video, I'm an expert in performing these surgeries that likely leave people paralyzed :S hehe

Wanna discuss this sample? What do you guys think?

I'm guessing that they will judge your answers based on how well reasoned, compassionate, and well put together they are, and not on how much bioethics we know etc. though I guess it would help coming up with an answer
I'd be interested in discussing this for practice. This is how I would answer (its not the best but I did it quick so that I could maybe simulate the real deal?.. I hope it doesn't suck):

(1) My answer to the patient would be that at this point in time I cannot perform the surgery. Despite there being an inherent risk of paralysis due to the type of surgery being performed, the patient also has certain cardiovascular complications that are potentially fatal if the surgery is performed. Assessing each individual's health prior to surgery is necessary to ensure that the benefits could outweigh the risks, and unfortunately, in this case, the risk of death due to his cardiovascular health is of deep concern. Recognizing the patients hardships, I would kindly recommend other surgeons that could offer a second opinion. Even though I have the highest success rate, there are others who are also skilled and successful that may, perhaps, offer an alternate assessment.

(2) I do not believe that insistence of surgery can relieve the surgeon of all liabilities. The patient is in a stressful situation due to his back pain, and as such, may come to a different immediate conclusion than he would if he were to contemplate the long-term potential risks of the surgery (especially given his current cardiovascular health and the risk of death). Thus, it is the surgeons ethical duty to make the best decision for the patient given his experience in this field. Although clearly difficult, sometimes refusing surgery and/or referring the patient to an alternate surgeon is the best option one can make.

(3) I do not believe that a patient should be allowed to sue if there are alternative surgeons that could very well perform the surgery. If this were to occur, then there is a risk of surgeons performing surgeries under duress. This situation would compromise the integrity of the medical profession as well as the long-term health of patients. An example of the latter would be a possible increase in post-operative complications as well as a possible increase in surgical fatalities. However, understanding that refusing surgery places patients in difficult situations, some viable alternatives should be presented to individuals who truly express a conflicting opinion than that of the surgeon.
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  #17  
Old 10-13-2010, 08:16 PM
aqm aqm is offline
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For the last question (allowed to sue) I would say yes, the patient must/can sue.

A informed consent does not relieve the surgeon of his/her actions. He/she should still be held accountable for medical malpractice if complications arise after informed consent has been obtained. This ensures that the notion of 'informed consent' is not abused by the medical community by protecting doctors and allowing them to make errors that may lead to complications besides those that were discussed while obtaining the consent. Hence, in order to protect the public and hold the medical community accountable for their actions, a patient should be allowed to sue the surgeon, particularly if the breach in conduct resulted in a complication that was not discussed when obtaining the informed consent.



What do you future doctors think?
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  #18  
Old 10-13-2010, 08:18 PM
future_doc future_doc is offline
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MA246, I like your approach. With respect to no. 2, it is the surgeon ehtical and legal duty. In exercising his discretion, the surgeon;s professional opinion is that the surgery is too risky, and he is entirely within his rights not to operate, indeed, he is duty bound not to given his professional opinion.

With respect to no. 3, I believe the question is not well thought put in the sense that the patient is allowed to sue anybody on earth if he finds a lawyer willing to take the case. THe wuestion should have been how to do rate the chances of success of legal proceedings taken by the patient against the surgeon, justifying your answer. The patient would need to demonstrate damages suffered, falt or negligence of the surgeon and causaility. I do not think the reqwuisite elements are there for the patient to make a successful case against the surgeon. Indeed, if the surgeon were to operate notwithst anding his professional opinion that the risks were too great, in such a case, the surgeon would be undertaking an unacceptable professional, ehtical and legal risk. Surgery is not like buying burgersw to which you are entitled on demand. Professional training, experience and judgment is invovled.
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For MMI Prep, See:
http://www.premed101.com/forums/showthread.php?t=48582
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  #19  
Old 10-13-2010, 08:46 PM
MA246 MA246 is offline
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Those are great points future doc. I think pointing out that anyone can sue, but its the strength of their case that is in question, is important to mention to balance out the argument. Great thoughts!
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  #20  
Old 10-15-2010, 07:49 AM
dzimmerman dzimmerman is offline
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I have to agree with a number of you as well. With regards to question 2 - of course the surgeon is still liable upon performing this surgery, especially so because he/she very clearly knew and explained the high risk associated with this particular patient and surgery.

And for question 3 - of course the patient is 'allowed' to sue the Dr for not performing the surgery, but the surgeon is well within their rights to refuse to perform a surgery they deem too 'high risk'. Happens all the time.
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